Patrice Holloway: Those DJ Shows (2005)

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Patrice Holloway: Those DJ Shows (2005)

Ridiculous to observe, but there was once a time when radio people weren't "shock jocks" (and ain't that the second easiest job in the world?) or "taking callers now."

Once upon a time radio people actually played music they loved which was right-then/right-now important and they brought new sounds to their audience.

Here's one stunt I fell for as a teenager. Radio Hauraki in Auckland announced the new Beatles' single Ticket to Ride ('65) was on its way from the airport, then in the taxi to the station then Paddy Burgin or some other DJ was about to play it. There was actually a physical sense of collective excitement as we called our friends to tell them, then all tuned in to listen.

(Sounded like the Monkees theme, said one guy who was probably right.)

We all talked about it at school the next day and I don't recall anyone being remotely cynical about Hauraki's ploy.

Has instagram/internet killed or dissipated that frisson of excitement?

Anyway here is the great Patrice Holloway (younger sister of Brenda) reminding us of those DJ shows when music meant something. Written by Smokey Robinson and originally recorded by the Supremes, Holloway -- who was the voice of Valerie Smith in Josie and the Pussycats -- sang this when she was 13, but it wasn't released until 41 years later (and she died the following year). Which has got to be some kind of record.

It's about when radio DJs were important for what they played and not how shocking they could be. 

And doesn't it just open with a sense of drama?

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory use the RSS feed for daily updates, and check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

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