Perrey and Kingsley; Strangers in the Night (1971)

 |   |  <1 min read

Perrey and Kingsley; Strangers in the Night (1971)

Taken from the album Kaleidoscopic Variations; Electronic Pop Music of the Future by innovators and composers Jean Jacques Perrey and Gershon Kingsley, this might be better subtitled "When Moog players go wonky".

And oddly enough for "future pop" they drew mostly on material like Umbrellas of Cherbourg, Lover's Concerto, Winchester Cathedral, the theme from The Third Man, Moon River and other such familiar pieces from the recent past.

Their originals hardly broached the idea of what future pop might sound like, other than it being created on Moog or the Jenny Ondioline which is a small keyboard with the the capacity to vibrate notes.

Some of the album isn't without interest but hilarity is guaranteed by this bizarre treatment of the Frank Sinatra hit.

It's as if the robots have taken over the laboratory, got drunk on methyl alcohol and turps, and started fooling around with the Moog.

I for one am glad that "future pop" turned out rather more interesting than this. 

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

Johnny Ace: Pledging My Love (1954)

Johnny Ace: Pledging My Love (1954)

And further to the now familiar story that death is good for a career . . . Johnny Ace had been enjoying a very good run of hits throughout the early Fifties, so much so that maybe he thought he... > Read more

Gary Puckett and the Union Gap: Young Girl (1968)

Gary Puckett and the Union Gap: Young Girl (1968)

Because they are often offered the temptations of the flesh, musicians will inevitably write and sing about it. There are a lot of songs about sex, some of them rather coded. There's also a... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

THE BARGAIN BUY: Eric Clapton; Unplugged Deluxe + DVD (Warners)

THE BARGAIN BUY: Eric Clapton; Unplugged Deluxe + DVD (Warners)

In late 1989, Eric Clapton released one of the most satisfying albums of his solo career to that point. Under the self-effacing title Journeyman, he delivered an album of blues-rock with a pop... > Read more

THE SIXTIES by JENNY DISKI: What a long strange trip . . .

THE SIXTIES by JENNY DISKI: What a long strange trip . . .

Has any decade been more feted, essayed and mythologised than the Sixties? The flowers in hippies’ headbands had barely wilted when the analysis began, and since then many of those who were... > Read more