National Lampoon: A prog-rock epic (1975)

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National Lampoon: A prog-rock epic (1975)

If you enjoyed the parody of a feminist anthem Elsewhere posted some time back (the terrific I'm A Woman) then you've clearly got a sense of humour and might just be up for this.

From the same album Goodbye Pop (which skewered drippy Neil Young, soppy soul and c'n'w) comes this stab at the pretensions of prog rock.

If I recall the liner notes about this song (and you can guess it was Christopher Guest who was behind it, Spinal Tap and A Mighty Wind would follow) said something like, "There are 27 groups wrong with this song".

See if you can spot them: Zappa, Focus, Yes, CS&N are the easy ones . . .

And it just gets better/worse as it goes.

Stick around for The Big Finish  . . .after the Essential Pause For Effect .

The serious interview/intro is funny enough though (especially if you know this).

Enjoy or endure, as you will.

For more one-offs, oddities or songs with an interesting backstory see From the Vaults

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