Teddy Thompson: Up Front and Down Low ((Verve)

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Teddy Thompson: Down Low
Teddy Thompson: Up Front and Down Low ((Verve)

The son of Richard is now on his third album but for this quietly exceptional album he takes a left-turn from his originals and goes back to the music he grew up with: American country which he grew up listening to at his dad's house.

This sensitive collection of classics and little-known covers (and one striking original, Down Low) proves what a fine and flexible voice he has, and how he possesses a particular gift for interpretation as he takes on lyrics by Dolly Parton, Merle Haggard, Ernest Tubb and George Jones.

With a superb band of seasoned country musicians, and friends such as Iris DeMent, Rufus Wainwright, guitarist Marc Ribot and others (including his dad on one track), this is an album that wears its heart openly and sounds the better for it.

Sounds like he is setting himself up for The Great Leap Forward. 

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