Lightning Dust: Lightning Dust (PopFrenzy/Rhythmethod)

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Lightning Dust: Lightning Dust (PopFrenzy/Rhythmethod)

Said it before, will say it again: when albums come from PopFrenzy they rise to the top of the heap, just on the basis of previous albums from the label (the Clientele, Camera Obscura) being so damn good.

No major disappointment with this one either where the shimmering, quivering voice of Amber Webber is quietly hypnotic in songs which are cut right back to the bone. Maybe they are trying too hard for effect in places, but there are plenty of bone-chilling alt.country/indiepop songs here which offer repeated frissons of delight.

I know nothing about these people (Webber and Joshua Wells) other than this album. But right now, this is enough.

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