Peter Wolf Crier: Inter-Be (Jagjaguwar)

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Peter Wolf Crier: Lion
Peter Wolf Crier: Inter-Be (Jagjaguwar)

Peter Wolf Crier are an electro-acoustic duo out of Minneapolis (not to be confused with this guy) and this is their modest debut album.

I say modest because while they utilise all the lo-tech vehicles at their command (loops, filters) they aren't intent on breaking free as a duo like the White Stripes or Black Keys. Their hearts are closer to the melodic school of M. Ward/early Beck and Bright Eyes.

So at its best this album delivers some real pretty acoustic-framed songs (Down Down Down, Untitled 101, especially You're So High) and some gently driving folk -- but you'd have to say that for the most part this is an album you'll enjoy if it crosses your path, but your life won't be poorer for never having heard it.

Next time, on the evidence of songs like the delightfully hypnotic Lion, I suspect. 

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