Fantazia: Mul Sheshe (Harmonia Mundi)

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Fantazia: Jawlina
Fantazia: Mul Sheshe (Harmonia Mundi)

More music from an unexpected source, in this instance North East London where this group formed around oud player/songwriter Yazid Fentazi to play the music of the Algerian Berbers -- with a jazzy Western spin courtesy of saxophones, trumpet, flute and keyboards.

Stupid band name unfortunately, but I guess that's what happens when you look at the mainman's surname.

But the music -- although perhaps a little too framed by Western jazz-pop to appeal to those in search of a more authentic Algerian musical experience -- has a real funky kick to it, and you can imagine it goes down especially well live.

As it is, it fair rocks off the disc anyway.

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