The Tickle: Subway (1967)

The Tickle: Subway (1967)

These none-hit wonders have quite a remarkable claim to fame, if fame can be reduced to a footnote in rock history.

The Tickle from Hull were the backing band on the debut album of a guy called David Bowie. Doubtless they got the gig playing with an unknown singer through producer Tony Visconti who twiddled the studio knobs here.

They were certainly up to the task of sounding prematurely eccentric and hippie-trippy on the evidence of this song -- which was subtitled Smokey Pokey World -- and its references to Tootsie rolls and rubber soles/Rubber Soul.

It was also nonsense, of course.

But it was 1967 and everyone was tripping out on something so . . .

Much favoured by Julian Cope apparently, Subway has the merits of a kaleidoscopic middle section and fizzing guitars.

And that might be all that we could say about it. But in many ways, that is more than enough.

Play loud, at your peril. 

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory use the RSS feed for daily updates, and check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section

The Flying Burrito Brothers: Wild Horses (1970)

The Flying Burrito Brothers: Wild Horses (1970)

Few Rolling Stones songs have had such an interesting history -- right up to Susan Boyle's recent interpretation -- as this one. Keith Richards has always claimed the title was his; Mick Jagger... > Read more

Joe Tex: I Gotcha (1972)

Joe Tex: I Gotcha (1972)

You could never say Joe Tex didn't live an interesting life, if being shot at by James Brown (who said Tex was copying his moves) constitutes something "interesting". Things weren't... > Read more

New Elsewhere

THE FAMOUS ELSEWHERE SONGWRITER QUESTIONNAIRE: Joel Fafard

THE FAMOUS ELSEWHERE SONGWRITER QUESTIONNAIRE: Joel Fafard

Let's be honest here: Not many people in New Zealand would have heard of long-running Canadian singer-songwriter Joel Fafard who writes his own material but is also rooted in Southern blues and... > Read more

Bjork: Vulnicura (One Little Indian/Inertia)

Bjork: Vulnicura (One Little Indian/Inertia)

As with many interesting musicians -- Cohen, Dylan, Faithfull, Cave, Waits et al come to mind -- Bjork is of rock culture (in that she is written about in the rock press) but not really part of it.... > Read more