THE MAGAZINE FOR CURIOUS PEOPLE

Elsewhere is a concept and a place, and Graham Reid goes there for his wide angle travels, writing, music review and interviews with writers, musicians and artists.

Elsewhere is an on-line magazine for new music (we filter out the mundane and spotlight the more interesting albums), different travel, arts and more. It is dedicated to the diversity and possibilities of Elsewhere. It's an equal opportunity enjoyer. Subscribe here (it's free) for a weekly newsletter.     Welcome . . .

Latest posts

Aro: He Rākau, He Ngārara (digital outlets)

Aro: He Rākau, He Ngārara (digital outlets)

19 Apr 2024  |  <1 min read

The Aro duo of husband and wife Charles and Emily Looker here present an immediately and immensely likable album which celebrates native plants and insects in te reo Māori and English language songs which sometimes sound like classic tunes from the Fifties (the lovely Tōtara with sweeping strings and Kaikōmako), beautiful folk (Pukatea) and contemporary pop... > Read more

Tōtara
Adrianne Lenker: Bright Future (digital outlets)

Adrianne Lenker: Bright Future (digital outlets)

19 Apr 2024  |  1 min read

Outside of the experimental alt.folk group Big Thief, writer-singer Adrianne Lenker has run a parallel career which is dinstictive and engrossing in its own right. This album is, at least on paper, her sixth (her previous, the simultaneously released Songs and Instrumentals album turned up in many best of 2020 albums) and has a typically interesting backstory: it was... > Read more

ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE; THE END OF THE BEATLES by PETER BROWN AND STEVEN GAINES

ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE; THE END OF THE BEATLES by PETER BROWN AND STEVEN GAINES

19 Apr 2024  |  2 min read

When Albert Goldman published his scurrilous, scum-sifting biography The Lives of John Lennon in 1988, the late Beatle's friends and acquaintances circled the wagons and vehemently denounced the book which, among other things, described Yoko Ono as a controlling junkie witch and suggested Lennon might have had a hand in what killed his friend Stuart Sutcliffe who died in... > Read more

Khruangbin: A La Sala (Dead Oceans/digital outlets)

Khruangbin: A La Sala (Dead Oceans/digital outlets)

15 Apr 2024  |  <1 min read

One of the problems which comes with an artist having a distinctive and unique sound is that unless they move it around a bit, that signature becomes so familiar that casual listeners think, “Oh, more of the same”. That hasn't been too much of a problem for this trio out of Texas whose debut The Universe Smiles Upon You established their lovely brand of... > Read more

Pon Pon
DEAR COLIN, DEAR RON edited by PETER SIMPSON

DEAR COLIN, DEAR RON edited by PETER SIMPSON

15 Apr 2024  |  1 min read

Peter Simpson's meticulous research into the life and work of Colin McCahon has already given us the highly readable and insightful surveys There is Only One Direction and Is This The Promised Land? That there's more to be said is no surprise because frequently Simpson – recipient of the Prime Minister's Award for Literary Achievement in 2017, even before those... > Read more

THE WRITE STUFF: Twenty years of schooling and they put you on the day shift

THE WRITE STUFF: Twenty years of schooling and they put you on the day shift

15 Apr 2024  |  3 min read  |  1

When I started at the Herald in 1987, Peter Scherer was the editor. Those were the days before titles like Editor-in-Chief or Editor-at-Large. Peter – who you could call by his first name – was simply the editor. Or more correctly The Editor. He was a remote figure to someone like me and I recall hearing little snippets about him: any aspiring... > Read more

JOHNNY ROTTEN, WRITING (1994): Punk picks up phlegm and pen

JOHNNY ROTTEN, WRITING (1994): Punk picks up phlegm and pen

14 Apr 2024  |  1 min read  |  1

When there is time, Elsewhere will be sourcing a rich vein of its archival material which was published in various places during the Eighties and Nineties which are not available on-line. These will most often be reproduced as they appeared in print. Some may be a little fuzzy in the reproduction but we think the story or interview are worth it for researchers or fans.... > Read more

The Goldebriars: Sing Out Terry O'Day (1964)

The Goldebriars: Sing Out Terry O'Day (1964)

14 Apr 2024  |  2 min read

One of the pleasures of digging around through old vinyl for Elsewhere's pages From the Vaults is in discovering the occasional overlooked classic, the rare or the just plain peculiar. Rummaging through discount bins takes time but there are often cheap rewards, in this case very cheap. What attracted me to this $3 album wasn't just the fact the two women were wearing... > Read more

A FAST 15 MINUTES: Start Me Up

A FAST 15 MINUTES: Start Me Up

14 Apr 2024  |  <1 min read

Here's something for you at Elsewhere when you have 15 minutes to spare. Have a listen to this, a short programme about how songs can be started with a hook, a riff, nagging repetition and so on. Enjoy . . . and see how many songs or titles you can recognise. > Read more

getting a song going
RECOMMENDED REISSUE: Giant Sand: Chore of Enchantment (Fire/digital outlets)

RECOMMENDED REISSUE: Giant Sand: Chore of Enchantment (Fire/digital outlets)

12 Apr 2024  |  1 min read

One of the most interesting interviews Elsewhere has ever done – and remember, we've done literally many-many hundreds, and then some – was with Howe Gelb. Gelb'sbest known for his band Giant Sand – which has clocked up nearly 30 albums – although he also has nearly that many under his own name. Back in 2011 we interviewed him at length... > Read more

No Reply
Laetitia Sadier: Rooting for Love (digital outlets)

Laetitia Sadier: Rooting for Love (digital outlets)

12 Apr 2024  |  <1 min read

Mostly known for her central role in Britain's wide-reaching, alternative band Stereolab, French-born singer and multi-instrumentalist Sadier has enjoyed a diverse solo career and interesting collaborations with the likes of San Francisco's Deerhoof and the Brazilian band Mombojó (as Modern Cosmology). For this fifth solo album she embraces nuanced art-pop... > Read more

Don't Forget You're Mine
LUCIEN JOHNSON, ACCLAIMED, REVIEWED AND INTERVIEWED (2024): Reaching for a quiet place

LUCIEN JOHNSON, ACCLAIMED, REVIEWED AND INTERVIEWED (2024): Reaching for a quiet place

9 Apr 2024  |  5 min read

When Wellington saxophonist Lucien Johnson released his album Wax///Wane three years ago it became an immediate Elsewhere favourite. At year's end it was in our Best of the Year list and also that of the Listener (which admittedly was a list chosen by us). What drew us to it was how different it was from most New Zealand jazz releases. In part we said,... > Read more

AMIRIA GRENELL, SHE WHO DOES/DOESN'T FIT (2024): The reward of being beyond categories

AMIRIA GRENELL, SHE WHO DOES/DOESN'T FIT (2024): The reward of being beyond categories

8 Apr 2024  |  3 min read

In his interesting book How the Beatles Destroyed Rock'n'Roll (they didn't, but . . . .), the writer Elijah Wald reminds us that it wasn't until the Fifties that songs became exclusively associated with specific singers. Before that – and there were exceptions like Sinatra and Paul Whiteman's jazz recordings – songs were tied to sheet music which anyone could... > Read more

Suzy Blue
KAYLEE BELL, PROFILED (2024): A star has risen

KAYLEE BELL, PROFILED (2024): A star has risen

8 Apr 2024  |  2 min read

When Kaylee Bell's new album Nights Like This debuted at the top of the New Zealand artist's chart recently and entered the main chart at number 3, few could have been surprised. It wasn't just that her time had come, but her style of music – mainstream country, strong on choruses, hooks and narrative – had also been penetrating the charts and public... > Read more

Life is Tough (But So Ami I), ft Navvy
THE TREMELOES. THE TREMELOES, CONSIDERED (1971): Guitar group not on the way out

THE TREMELOES. THE TREMELOES, CONSIDERED (1971): Guitar group not on the way out

8 Apr 2024  |  3 min read

When the Beatles broke through in 1963 there were any number of other groups poised to ride in their wake. Many of them, in the manner of Fifties artists, put the name of the singer out front: Gerry and the Pacemakers, Freddie and the Dreamers, Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders, Derry and the Seniors (in '61 the first Liverpool band to record an album) and others, like .... > Read more

Here Comes My Baby
Texas Jim Robertson: The Last Page of Mein Kampf (1946)

Texas Jim Robertson: The Last Page of Mein Kampf (1946)

8 Apr 2024  |  <1 min read

Texas-born Jim Robertson was one of those who sang about the Second World War and knew what he was talking about. No stay-at-home, when he was rejected by the army he enlisted in the marines and saw action in the Pacific then ended up in Japan after their surrender. At almost two metres tall, he'd been raised on a ranch, learned guitar and banjo from his father, and... > Read more

Sin City: Another Round (digital outlets)

Sin City: Another Round (digital outlets)

8 Apr 2024  |  <1 min read

Sometimes the cover or album title tells you exactly what you need to know. And so it is with ramshackle rockers Sin City whose Delaney Davidson-produced debut Welcome to Sin City of two years ago we described as offering “loose-limbed swagger, braggadocio, ramshackle country rock'n'roll, barroom ballads and country cliches mined for knowing humour”. This... > Read more

I'm Your Man
A HOME AWAY FROM HOME: Tony's, endangered

A HOME AWAY FROM HOME: Tony's, endangered

7 Apr 2024  |  3 min read

There’s a scene that has played out hundreds of times at Tony’s restaurant on Wellesley Street in central Auckland. I witnessed it frequently. A young person, possibly a student, asks if there’s any chance of waiting work. Often they are anxious and looking for their first paying job, maybe presenting what passes for a CV at their age. But... > Read more

Ride: Interplay (digital outlets)

Ride: Interplay (digital outlets)

7 Apr 2024  |  1 min read

Once the bright hope of shoegaze in the Britpop era, Oxford's Ride lost momentum with Carnival of Light after two fine albums and broke up. Their sound had been a template which – while it borrowed from Jesus and Mary Chain a little and the Manchester sound – was highly appealing. The band also had two excellent songwriters in Mark Gardener (who enjoyed a... > Read more

Midnight Rider
Norah Jones: Visions (Blue Note/digital outlets)

Norah Jones: Visions (Blue Note/digital outlets)

6 Apr 2024  |  1 min read  |  1

It's a fair observation to say that those who wail and rail against Yoko Ono's music have barely heard a note of it. Okay, some of her music could be challenging, but not all of it. However that's something the naysayers don't know because cheap cynicism and prejudice usually means you don't have to make much of an effort, if any. That infects some fairly mainstream... > Read more

Queen of the Sea
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