Museum: traces of (Inakustik/Yellow Eye)

Museum: Midwinter
Museum: traces of (Inakustik/Yellow Eye)

In the shorthand of the internet (where this group gave away their first two EPs) this is “for fans of Interpol, Bauhaus, Placebo . . .” which is helpful, but doesn't explain everything about this four-piece rock outfit from Germany.

Although this debut album sometimes seems more alt.New York/New Wave or angsty-Anglorock than hip'n'happening Berlin, they have a pared back approach which doesn't discount a sense of widescreen grandeur (Feast is a Feast, For the Very First Time), and while they sometimes work repetitious melodic figures that add to the intensity (the slow-burning With Love).

Museum aren't short on pop (the chipper sounding but dark And Now like mid-era Blur, the sonically manipulated ballad The Have or To Be) or averse to nodding towards slashing electronica (the brooding The Law) and even come off a little like Kraftwerk with guitars.

Be darned of that ain't cowpoke alt.rock on Eden.

After about eight of these 11 songs their reach for the grand gesture gets a little wearisome . . . although, as its title suggests, the penultimate Midwinter changes the mood towards the Smiths.

Overall, like the car on the cover, finely tooled but damaged.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Melanie Pain: My Name (Cartell/Border)

Melanie Pain: My Name (Cartell/Border)

While Phil Spector was being charged with murder there were any number of stories of how he would wave guns around, but rather fewer people noted that back in 1962 he'd recorded the rather dodgy He... > Read more

Flip Grater: Pigalle (Maiden/ Rhythm Method)

Flip Grater: Pigalle (Maiden/ Rhythm Method)

At the time, Elsewhere critically noted Flip Grater's previous album When I'm Awake I'm At War was weighed down with the first person singular. Every song was "I" (and invariably... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

GUEST WRITER SARAH JANE ROWLAND sees power corrupt in stark black and white

GUEST WRITER SARAH JANE ROWLAND sees power corrupt in stark black and white

Robert Rossen’s tightly directed 1949 drama All The King’s Men is a story of the moral and political corruption of an honest hick swayed by an unchecked ego and greed for power. It is... > Read more

CAN'T BE SATISFIED, THE LIFE AND TIMES OF MUDDY WATERS by ROBERT GORDON

CAN'T BE SATISFIED, THE LIFE AND TIMES OF MUDDY WATERS by ROBERT GORDON

When McKinley Morganfield’s grandmother named him Muddy after the nearby Mississippi and he later took the surname Waters, there seemed something oddly symbolic in it. Here was man who... > Read more