Elsewhere Art . . . Rod Stewart

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Elsewhere Art . . . Rod Stewart

Can't remember which Rod Stewart album prompted this, but when you write a jazz column you look for anything which will hook in passers-by who might otherwise recoil from the J-word.

And Rod's album had a track titled Charlie Parker Loves Me . . . so Rod kickstarted a piece about Parker.

By this time Rod had separated from his Kiwi-born wife Rachel Hunter so the idea of hauling her recognisable features in was a bit of a bonus.

Someone said they thought it was cruel but . . . I thought it was funny.

I remember also deciding to make it a bit rough-cut for some reason. Maybe because I was rejecting the notion of slick computer-generated art which was becoming the norm and I was loyally sticking with collage.

I was probably wrong because it does look a bit amateurish in the comparison with other magazine art. But my editor at the time loved my style because it looked a bit more personal, was unpredictable and different.

Rod and Rachel to get people reading about Parker?

Yes, I guess that is a different approach.

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