Rory Block: Shake 'Em on Down (Stony Plain)

 |   |  <1 min read

Rory Block: Mississippi Man
Rory Block: Shake 'Em on Down (Stony Plain)

Singer-guitarist Rory Block learned directly from Mississippi John Hurt, Son House, Bukka White and others and here – through originals and retooled covers – acknowledges the great innovator Mississippi Fred McDowell who (despite singing I Do Not Play No Rock'n'Roll) influenced blues-rock musicians like the young Stones, and tutored Bonnie Raitt.

Block met him at a formative stage in her life so this comes from an honest place.

Get past the lack of grit in her voice in places, concentrate on her country-blues and slide guitar, and this is a fine tribute with extensive, thoughtful liner notes.

Like the sound of this? Then check out this

Share It

Your Comments

Clive - Aug 9, 2011

Good Work Graham bringing everyones attention to Rory.She is the real deal,I have all of her work.I think she more than just met Fred McDowell,after she ran away from home at the age of 15 in 1965 and ended up in LA.I am waiting for Rory's bio which is on its way from the States,so this should reveal more !.She has also done tribute records for Sun House who she knew and Robert Johnson who idolised Sun HouseShe recently toured with the Johnson family doing Gospel and Delta Blies.One of Rory's great mates is Bonnie Rait and the hung around with the same old black blues guys.Check out Bonnies "The Lost Broadcast-Philadelphia 1972' which has just surfaced,brilliant accoustic blues

post a comment

More from this section   Blues articles index

Oli Brown: Heads I Win Tails You Lose (Ruf/Yellow Eye)

Oli Brown: Heads I Win Tails You Lose (Ruf/Yellow Eye)

The blues goes in cycles of visibility: there were those great days of the late Forties/Fifties in the South and the early Sixties in Chicago; the British blues boom of the early/mid Sixties (John... > Read more

Big Daddy Wilson: Love is the Key (Ruf/Yellow Eye)

Big Daddy Wilson: Love is the Key (Ruf/Yellow Eye)

Singer Wilson from North Carolina is yet another of those US blues (and jazz) artists who found a more sympathetic and profitable environment in Europe and these days operates out of Germany... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Dr Tree: Dr Tree (EMI)

Dr Tree: Dr Tree (EMI)

When this album came out in the mid-Seventies jazz-rock fusion was at its peak and many otherwise sensible jazz musicians were wooed to the dark side. Few came out with any dignity (they just... > Read more

TAL FARLOW (1921- 1998): Fading, like notes in the breeze

TAL FARLOW (1921- 1998): Fading, like notes in the breeze

It is a very curious thing that as pop and rock music -- which never used to argue for longevity -- are constantly excavating their pasts and delivering collections of their most minor or ephemeral... > Read more