Chicago Transit Authority: I'm a Man (1969)

 |   |  1 min read

Chicago Transit Authority: I'm a Man (1969)

For a brief period before they shortened their name to Chicago and became boring -- and for my money it was very brief, and they became very boring -- this big group with an ever-changing but hardly memorable line-up were a tanked-up rock band.

Their debut album in '69 was a double, they had a political edge as befitted the volatile times (they had formed in '67 in, yes, Chicago and moved to LA in '68) and Jimi Hendrix was a great admirer of Terry Kath's guitar work which was sometimes saturated in feedback.

On their Chicago Transit Authority self-titled debut there is Kath's track Free Form Guitar (here) which might have come from an early album by Sonic Youth.

CTA were signed by session musician/producer James William Guerico who had been around for Frank Zappa's double-vinyl debut Freak Out! in '66 and was also working with street poet Moondog, the alternative comedy group Firesign Theatre and was just starting to hone Blood Sweat and Tears into a formidable act.

CTA were much accclaimed by serious critics for their fusion of jazz and rock.

They were one of the era's great "jamming" bands and extended out versions of their chosen material (covers like I'm A Man, or originals).

This prog-rock treatment (more rock than prog) of the Spencer Davis Group's hit was one of the highpoints of that impressive debut album.

Then they became simply Chicago and they started springing radio-friendly hits and it became easy to lose interest in a band with an ever-changing line-up -- and which simply numbered its albums rather than named them.

Even on the CTA album the seeds of their more MOR tendencies were evident in the song Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is? which somewhat lost its political edge when an edited version received saturation radio play.

But for a taste of Chicago before the anonymity set in -- and if you only know them for classic hits ballads -- this is taste of what they once were.

Briefly.

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory get daily updates From the Vaults.

Share It

Your Comments

Peter Huitson - Apr 7, 2012

CTA's version of "I'm a Man" is an absolute blinder! They rhythms and percussions are so tight you would swear it was a black or Latin American band - something to really get your foot tapping. This track is worth the price of the album on its own - highly recommended (you need the extended version though - the shortened version just doesn't cut the mustard like the longer one).

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

The Beau Brummels: Two Days 'til Tomorrow (1967)

The Beau Brummels: Two Days 'til Tomorrow (1967)

Producer Lenny Waronker -- who worked with artists as diverse as Nancy Sinatra, Randy Newman, Ry Cooder and Rickie Lee Jones -- recognised in the voice of the Beau Brummels' singer Sal Valentino a... > Read more

Waylon Jennings: Are You Sure Hank Done it This Way (1975)

Waylon Jennings: Are You Sure Hank Done it This Way (1975)

Just from the repeated electric strum here, Waylon Jennings was announcing a different kind of country music: and its minimal sound threw even greater attention on his lyrics which questioned the... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Tokyo, Japan: Night cries

Tokyo, Japan: Night cries

The sound of a baby crying in the night is a terrifying thing. The screams go on and on, no one seems to be taking care of it, you look out your window into the darkness but cannot see where the... > Read more

The Incredible String Band: Wee Tam and The Big Huge (1968)

The Incredible String Band: Wee Tam and The Big Huge (1968)

Sometimes for my own private amusement I will sing aloud The Incredible String Band's The Son of Noah's Brother in its entirety. All 16 seconds of it. The lyrics run, "Many were the... > Read more