Caveman: I'm Ready (1991)

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Caveman: I'm Ready (1991)

Just as Run DMC found when they hooked themselves up with a metal guitar part from Aerosmith for Walk This Way (here) -- and King Kurlee confirmed when he got Blackmore Jnr in to play the classic Smoke on the Water riff (here) -- when hip-hop appropriates from tough rock the results can be pretty powerful.

Caveman out of High Wycombe, were the first UK rap act signed to a US label (Profile) but even though they recorded this single in London it sounds very American in every way -- and of course pulling in Jimi Hendrix's Crosstown Traffic for some added punch was a real smart move.

This has a tough edge and even if Caveman only got as far two albums before splitting up, they left behind this excellent slice of bragging vinyl which here come to you with essential surface noise.

For more one-offs or songs with a backstory see From the Vaults.

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