Caveman: I'm Ready (1991)

 |   |  <1 min read

Caveman: I'm Ready (1991)

Just as Run DMC found when they hooked themselves up with a metal guitar part from Aerosmith for Walk This Way (here) -- and King Kurlee confirmed when he got Blackmore Jnr in to play the classic Smoke on the Water riff (here) -- when hip-hop appropriates from tough rock the results can be pretty powerful.

Caveman out of High Wycombe, were the first UK rap act signed to a US label (Profile) but even though they recorded this single in London it sounds very American in every way -- and of course pulling in Jimi Hendrix's Crosstown Traffic for some added punch was a real smart move.

This has a tough edge and even if Caveman only got as far two albums before splitting up, they left behind this excellent slice of bragging vinyl which here come to you with essential surface noise.

For more one-offs or songs with a backstory see From the Vaults.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

Massiel: La La La (1968)

Massiel: La La La (1968)

In 1968 middle-class, middle-aged (and some kids) Britain held a collective breath. That year the Eurovision Song Contest was being hosted at the Royal Albert Hall, after a bare-footed Sandie Shaw... > Read more

Flesh D-Vice: Legend of Lugosi (1989)

Flesh D-Vice: Legend of Lugosi (1989)

This is just here for those of us old enough -- and perhaps dumb enough -- to remember the sheer visceral power and life-threatening live shows that this band (from Palmerston North? I will stand... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Howlin' Wolf: The Howlin' Wolf Album (Set on Down)

Howlin' Wolf: The Howlin' Wolf Album (Set on Down)

One of the assertions on the cover of this album – released in 69, reissued after a long absence – isn't true. Bluesman Howlin' Wolf had been an “early adopter” of... > Read more

The Crazy World of Arthur Brown: The Crazy World of Arthur Brown (1968)

The Crazy World of Arthur Brown: The Crazy World of Arthur Brown (1968)

By the latter part of the Sixties there was a clear difference between how American and British "hippies" perceived "the psychedelic era". If it's true that no music movement... > Read more