The Woofers and Tweeters Ensemble: Daytripper (1983)

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The Woofers and Tweeters Ensemble: Daytripper (1983)

And you thought YouTube threw up fly-by-night stars and oddities? This one puts the surfing cat and dancing pig into perspective.

In the early Eighties a couple of Australians -- over a few wines -- fiddled with computer technology to simulate the sound of dogs barking and used it to have the "dogs" "sing" a Beatles song.

And lo! An album of barked-out Beatles songs (from the pre-psychedelic era, they weren't that stupid) was born. It sold almost a million in Australia -- and the "dogs" went global as a novelty act.

Then there were pirated copies, massed litigation, spin-offs and rip-offs . . . .

The legacy of the artists was tainted forever.

Perhaps they needed Allen Klein to come in and sort things out?

Here, for your listening pleasure or as an endurance test, are the Woofers and Tweeters.

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory check out From the Vaults.

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