Son House: Levee Camp Moan (1970)

 |   |  1 min read

Son House: Levee Camp Moan (1970)

By 1964 when the British blues explosion was starting to take off, the great and tetchy Son House was living in retirement and spent most of days drinking. He hadn't played much since his friend Willie Brown had died more than a decade previous.

He'd preached some but mostly got drunk, he hadn't played guitar in five years.

But when his sessions from some 20 years previous were reissued and blues enthusiasts in Britain, seeking out anything from the old Delta bluesmen, heard him as one of the authentic voices they were looking for -- alongside Sleepy John Estes, Bukka White, Mississippi John Hurt and others.

Son House -- born Eddie House somewhere close to the birth of the 20th century -- enjoyed a sudden second career and his new manager Dick Waterman found a doctor who could prescribe something to control the senile tremour in his hands so he could play again. He recorded an album for Columbia, played the Newport Folk Festival and Carnegie Hall, and in '66 embarked on a British tour.

His musical life began again, and to greater acclaim than he had ever experienced.

In 1970 he played London's 100 Club and an album of Delta blues and spirituals was recorded. It included his famous Death Letter Blues (later covered by the White Stripes) a testifying John the Revelator (covered by Gillian Welch), and some monologues. They were his last great recordings.

John the Revelator
 

After this Son House slowly slipped away. He continued to play but became increasingly senile and befuddled, often forgetting songs on stage. In '76 he was taken into the care of relatives.

He lived another 12 years.

It had been some life, from preaching as a teenager to prison in Parchman Farm (murder) and then the life of an itinerant bluesman, marrying as he went (he was married at least five times). But mostly he was in the wilderness.

However there was no denying that his was an authentic voice of the Delta blues.

For more one-off, oddities or songs with an interesting backstory check the daily postings at From the Vaults. And for more blues go here.

Share It

Your Comments

Jeremy - Feb 25, 2011

Pretty keen on Cassandra Wilson's version of Death Letter Blues as well.

CRAIG - May 9, 2012

Graham, great site but you need to set something up so that comments like the one by john waxwing (see above) are not posted. Everyone is entitled to an opinon but when its racist and ignorant it is not valid and does not deserve the light of day.

Graham Reid - May 10, 2012

Agreed Craig regarding racist morons (aren't they THEY most inarticulate people on the planet?) and I have deleted that guy's comment.
Sorry folks: I am traveling a lot at the moment (after morocco i have fetched in in portsmouth, UK tonight and sweden beckons in two days) so haven't been able to be diligent and delete just plain dumb comments.
cheers.

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

NRA: Bruce McLaren (1991)

NRA: Bruce McLaren (1991)

The ferocious NRA (Not Really Anything) were one of those Flying Nun bands of the late Eighties/early Nineties that you either got, or steered well clear of. Live, they were not for the... > Read more

Eddie Vedder, Neil and Liam Finn: Not Given Lightly (2009)

Eddie Vedder, Neil and Liam Finn: Not Given Lightly (2009)

After Chris Knox suffered his massive stroke in June 2009, there was an understandable outpouring of support from friends and fellow travellers who knew him, although it's fair to say not many... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Shemekia Copeland: America's Child (Alligator/Southbound)

Shemekia Copeland: America's Child (Alligator/Southbound)

This daughter of famed tough Texas blues singer/guitarist Johnny Copeland pulls in a remarkable supporting cast for this, her eighth album: Steve Cropper, Rhiannon Giddens, John Prine (on his own... > Read more

CLASSIC ALBUM: PET SOUNDS a tele-doco on Prime Rock

CLASSIC ALBUM: PET SOUNDS a tele-doco on Prime Rock

Much as we love this Beach Boys' album – except Sloop John B, no one can convince us that it fits the theme – we must surely have reached peak Pet. There have been the expanded... > Read more