Tiny Tim: We Love It/When I Walk With You (1968)

 |   |  1 min read

Tiny Tim: We Love It/When I Walk With You (1968)

If you were there at the time, Tiny Tim was novelty act: the long-haired eccentric with a ukulele singing Tiptoe Through the Tulips in an impossibly high falsetto.

But that was the late Sixties for you, a time when the retro sound of Winchester Cathedral by the New Vaudeville Band and I Was Kaiser Bill's Batman by Whistling Jack Smith could be hits alongside Hendrix, the Who and Procol Harum.

Tiny Tim was just another oddity, like Napoleon XIV with They're Coming t Take Me Away Ha Ha.

But not exactly.

Tiny Tim -- New Yorker Herbert Kaury, born 1932 -- had an encyclopedic knowledge of songs from the Twenties, Thirties and Forties, some of his first recordings of more contemporary songs were with the then-unnamed Band, he fell in with them and Dylan in Woodstock and Dylan had an idea about working on a circus film with him . . .

timTiny Tim was nominated for a Grammy for his album of children's songs, his Tiny Tim's Second Album (from where these songs come, with his parents on the cover) was produced by Richard Perry with some arrangements by Perry Botkin Jnr . . .

So yes, he was a novelty act at one level, but his scholarly knowledge of old songs and his loving delivery of them (especially on later albums which garnered no attntion at all, he was considered a one-hit owner) meant he earned a place larger than a footnote.

More performance artist than circus freak, and of course a whole lot smarter than many gave him credit for, Tiny Tim had a wider vocal and emotional range than that unforgettable falsetto.

But he that too.

Tiny Tim died in 1996. He was 64.

For more one-offs, oddities or songs with an interesting backstory see the daily updates at From the Vaults.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

Kronos Quartet: Sorrow Tears and Blood (2013)

Kronos Quartet: Sorrow Tears and Blood (2013)

For many decades the Kronos Quartet has been commissioning, performing and recording material by contemporary composers, but also adapting rock classics (JImi Hendrix's Purple Haze) and world music... > Read more

Reverend J.M. Gates: Hitler and Hell (1941)

Reverend J.M. Gates: Hitler and Hell (1941)

The Rev Gates (b 1884) was preacher-cum-gospel singer whose style was often call-and-response in the manner of Baptist churches. He worked out of Atlanta and aside from sermonising he was a... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Easy Star All-Stars: Thrillah (Easy Star)

Easy Star All-Stars: Thrillah (Easy Star)

And of all the tributes to Michael Jackson, this might be the most expected. Easy Star All-Stars make a habit of taking classic rock and giving it the reggae/dub treatment (Beatles, Radiohead,... > Read more

JOHNNY CASH AT FOLSOM PRISON;THE MAKING OF A MASTERPIECE by MICHEAL STREISSGUTH

JOHNNY CASH AT FOLSOM PRISON;THE MAKING OF A MASTERPIECE by MICHEAL STREISSGUTH

A hip comedy club, New York, late 1980s. The stand-up delivers a one-liner which has the smart set baying: "Does anyone know why Johnny Cash still wears black?"  At the time... > Read more