Bob Dylan: Dirge (1974)

 |   |  1 min read

Bob Dylan: Dirge (1974)

While flicking the pages of a rock magazine the other day I came on an interview with a young musician who cited among his current favourite listening Bob Dylan's Planet Waves.

When that album was released it was met with polite but hardly laudatory reviews, and even the enormously successful and highly profitable tour with the Band (Dylan's first since '66 during which many of the albums songs were featured) didn't push along sales. At the end of '74, despite it topping the charts on advance orders, it had barely sold 600,000 copies in the US, an alarmingly small figure given applications had been received for around 10 million concert tickets which showed "an explosion of feeling" towards Dylan, as Playboy wrote in its review of this album.

But at this distance it is understandable why a young musician might find the album more interesting than it seemed for those who were there for Highway 61, Blonde on Blonde and John Wesley Harding.

The songs are spare and taut, melodically interesting with sometimes angular arrangements, and many offer flashes of the deeply personal. Some are dark, others -- like the hugely popular Forever Young -- seem sentimental, warm and domestic. It is an album where a relationship (Dylan was separating from his wife Sara) is sometimes being viewed through a fractured prism.

Dirge is a difficult and uncomfortable song, seen in the light of that marriage breakdown.

It is, according to Clinton Heylin, "an astonishing catharsis of years of seething resentment, seemingly directed at an ex-lover but surely one of that small body of songs in his oeuvre directed as much at his audience as some disembodied lover".

Heylin puts it alongside It Ain't Me Babe and What Was it That You Wanted in that regard . . . and he might have mentioned Positively 4th Street and even Like a Rolling Stone also.

Dylan, playing piano, and Robbie Robertson on guitar nailed it on the second take. It was the last song to be recorded for the album.

Even though the context has faded and the circumstances which prompted it have disappeared into the fog of time, Dirge -- the name given to a song written for a funeral, lest we forget -- stands as one of Dyan's most commanding studio performances.

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory use the RSS feed for daily updates, and check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

Share It

Your Comments

Jeffrey Paparoa Holman - Jul 18, 2011

Hi Graham

I loved this album when it hit the streets in 1974 (not my best year ever): it caught something I haven't found elsewhere. I love Wedding Song too - but Dirge is unforgettable (except by Bob, who never plays it). I rank it with Idiot Winds as one of his most excoriating and bitter pieces, which both sound as if he's taking aim at American Emptiness, more than any one person.
Such great musicianship. Thanks.
Jeffrey

Music of Bob Dylan - Aug 14, 2020

We are actively promoting a link to this interesting topic on The Bob Dylan Project at:
https://thebobdylanproject.com/Song/id/153/Dirge

If you are interested, we are a portal to all the great information related to this topic.

Join us inside Bob Dylan Music Box.

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

Rochelle Vinsen: I Wanna Swim With Him (1965)

Rochelle Vinsen: I Wanna Swim With Him (1965)

For those with a long memory, Wellington's Rochelle Vinsen is but a footnote in New Zealand pop history, the girl who gained some minor attention with My Boyfriend's Got a Beatle haircut in early... > Read more

Paul McCartney: Ode to a Koala Bear (1983)

Paul McCartney: Ode to a Koala Bear (1983)

Okay, at a time when Paul McCartney's whole recording career has been given serious consideration at Elsewhere, this seems frivolous and cruel. But fun. This odd song appeared on B-side of... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . Z'EV: He bangs the drum, and then some

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . Z'EV: He bangs the drum, and then some

When a couple of writers from the then-recently launched Re/Search tabloid went to visit the experimental percussionist known as Z'EV in 1981, the conversation was esoteric and philosophical.... > Read more

GUEST WRITER MITCH MYERS pays tribute to bands that weren't The Band

GUEST WRITER MITCH MYERS pays tribute to bands that weren't The Band

As music lovers around the world celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Band’s landmark Music From Big Pink debut, MAGNET’s Mitch Myers digs a little deeper to introduce... > Read more