Chuck Berry: La Juanda (Espanol) (1957)

 |   |  <1 min read

Chuck Berry: La Juanda (Espanol) (1957)

Long before Paul McCartney wrote his slightly twee ballad Michelle for the album Rubber Soul, Nat King Cole and Chuck Berry were also addressing the problems across langauge barriers.

But while McCartney lamented his inability with French and could say little more than his schoolboy "Michelle, ma belle, sont des mots qui vont tres bien ensemble" to his intended lover, Chuck used his inability (or alleged inability) for rather more cunning purposes.

In this Latin-flavoured minor work he uses fumbling Spanish to pretend he doesn't understand the Mexican prostitute.

Yep, that would be Chuck.

He'd haggle about the price of anything, you suspect.

For more on-offs or songs with an interesting back-story see From the Vaults

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

Fatal Jelly Space: Moonlit Track (1990)

Fatal Jelly Space: Moonlit Track (1990)

Although they had a band name which wouldn't have disgraced a prog-rock outfit of the Seventies, Auckland's Fatal Jelly Space were rather far removed from lengthy noodling. They were an... > Read more

Anna Russell: Folk Songs (1952)

Anna Russell: Folk Songs (1952)

With her beautifully modulated tones and remarkable voice -- which went from a soprano squeal to a screech quite effortlessly -- Anna Russell was an enormously popular comedy-cum-classical act in... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

John Rae: Lighthouse (Thick Records)

John Rae: Lighthouse (Thick Records)

Recorded in Rotorua and inspired by the traditional music of Japan, this album lead by the highly qualified drummer John Rae manages to exist somewhere between world music-cum-jazz, meditative... > Read more

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . MARZETTE WATTS: Everywhere I hear the sound of . . .

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . MARZETTE WATTS: Everywhere I hear the sound of . . .

Should anyone doubt the close connection between American free jazz and the rise of radical black politics in the Sixties they only need to look to the life of saxophonist Marzette Watts.... > Read more