Walter Robertson: Sputterin' Blues (1955)

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Walter Robertson: Sputterin' Blues (1955)

When Roger Daltrey of the Who deliberately stuttered in My Generation it was in some sense to capture the frustration of youth, and also to add piquancy to what might come next when he sang "Why don't you all f-f-f-f ...."

Bluesman Walter Robertson (sometimes Robinson) probably had no such intention on this song which is borderline tasteless and something of a novelty item.

Not a lot is known about him, other than he came out of California (not all bluesmen came from the Delta) and was an excellent harmonica player, appearing on Johnny Fuller's Prowling Blues which was probably cut at the same session as this, one of two known songs by Robertson/Robinson. (The other being I've Done Everything I Can on the flipside).

Make what you will of it but you have to agree, they don't write songs like this anymore. Probably never did, just this once. 

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

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