Jimi Hendrix: Little Drummer Boy/Silent Night/Auld Lang Syne (1969)

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Jimi Hendrix: Little Drummer Boy/Silent Night/Auld Lang Syne (1969)

"And so this is Christmas, and what have you done?"

Time for reflection amidst (hopefully) enjoying family and friends . . . and we will all do that in our own way.

Jimi did it this way.

This was part of some long studio jamming, the first two songs here were recorded in December '69 with drummer Buddy Miles and bassist Billy Cox in the Record Plant in New York and apparently welded onto Auld Lang Syne recorded slightly later in the session.

The result was released as a 12 inch promo single in '74, then again in '79.

Doesn't add much to the Hendrix legend, but it is certainly an appropriately seasonal item at this time.

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory use the RSS feed for daily updates, and check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

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Mike - Dec 25, 2013

Amazing! Controlled feedback and sustain all the way through! A long time Hendrix fan and I have never heard that one before!!

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