John Lennon, Child of Nature (1968)

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John Lennon, Child of Nature (1968)

Give them credit, the Beatles were always incredibly productive and even on their holidays -- like the six weeks that Lennon and Harrison spent in Rishikesh with the Maharishi -- they were frequently writing.

Not everything was a masterpiece of course, and this demo by Lennon betrays a bit too much of the hippie communing with the world around him. It was a few months after the Summer of Love so I guess in the warm climate of India the vibe lasted just that bit longer.

But he obviously liked the tune because two years later he ressurected it with very different words and it became one of his most familiar songs, which Bryan Ferry covered after Lennon's death.

If you don't recognise it, the clip below should help.

Motto: never throw anything away, you might just find a use for it some day. 

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory use the RSS feed for daily updates, and check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

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