Otis Rush: All Your Love (1958)

 |   |  <1 min read

Otis Rush: All Your Love (1958)

One of Eric Clapton's most definitive and distinctive early statements was his cover of this song by the great Otis Rush, which appeared on the John Mayall Blues Breakers album of '65. You can hear his version at that link.

What is interesting is just what a precision player Clapton was. He hears every nuance of Rush's version, but delivers a steely, crisp but deeply felt rendition which remains faithful to the original . . . but also stamps his own mark on it by making it slightly spooky and disembodied.

Rush was in his early 20s when he cut this version -- just a couple of years older than Clapton when he recorded his version -- and brought a raw edge to it. Clapton stepped back from that and was more cautious in his emotions.

But in the Clapton version the emotion is all in the guitar work.

Interesting then to see the older Rush and Clapton together on this classic in the clip below. Both are more considered, but spin it out beautifully as a different song again through clever dynamics. 

For more one-off or unusual songs with an interesting backstory seeFrom the Vaults.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

The Archies: Sugar Sugar (1969)

The Archies: Sugar Sugar (1969)

Okay, it's irritating rot-your-teeth bubblegum . . . but wait, there is more to this than you might think -- and remember it came out in the year of Altamont, Hendrix, the Manson murders and so on.... > Read more

The Chequers: Ask for Reggae (1973)

The Chequers: Ask for Reggae (1973)

The Chequers were a fairly minor league reggae outfit who quite quickly moved away from the template and into what some have called on-line "dodgy disco" (which is a little unfair, it was... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

THE BARGAIN BUY: The Monkees; The Original Album Series (Rhino)

THE BARGAIN BUY: The Monkees; The Original Album Series (Rhino)

By the merest twist of fate, the history of popular American music 50 years ago could well have been very different if just one man had got a different job. Stephen Stills -- a wonderful... > Read more

STEVE REICH INTERVIEWED (1990): The maximal minimalist

STEVE REICH INTERVIEWED (1990): The maximal minimalist

American composer Steve Reich finishes telling of his new work – an enormous three-years-in-the making multi-media project – and then reflects on the austerity of his early music which... > Read more