Freddie McCoy: Spider Man (1966)

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Freddie McCoy: Spider Man (1966)

Despite the bottomless section of Elsewhere entitled From the Vaults being replete with oddities, obscurities, lost non-classics and dumb comedy stuff, a quick search reveals a gap.

There is no vibraphone track.

We rectify the omission with this energetic track by Freddie McCoy recorded at Rudy Van Gelder's studio for McCoy's Prestige album of the same name.

McCoy was a star in Harlem hot spots and his soulful sounds had a funk edge too . . . as witnessed here in the piano solo by Charles L Wilson.

But there's more at work here when that rhythm section of bassist Steve Davis and Rudy Lawless on drums hit some left-field Latin-cum-rumba groove.

Not surprising then that this was a popular piece at DJ Paul Murphy's Return of the Jazz Club nights in London in the Eighties when jazz -- especially through the grooves of UK heroes Andy Sheppard and Courtney Pine -- was making the dance end of the genre hip again.

815kr_3oGWL._SL1400_This is lifted from the 2014 Ace Records compilation Paul Murphy Presents The Return of The Jazz Club, a snappy 15 track collection which includes keen grooves by Sonny Rollins (St Thomas), Red Garland (Manteca), Thelonious Monk (Bye-Ya), Mose Allison (Parchman Farm), Jack McDuff (The Brother) and others.

Including the thrilling Eddie Jefferson white-knuckle envy of Flithy McNasty. 

A tip?

Seek this collection out.

It swings. 

(Paul Murphy Presents The Return of The Jazz Club is available in New Zealand through Border Music) 

For more one-off, oddities or songs with an interesting backstory see From the Vaults.

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