The Third Power: Getting' Together (1970)

 |   |  1 min read

The Third Power: Getting' Together (1970)

Aside from unleashing his own extraordinary music onto an unsuspecting world in '67, Jimi Hendrix also kicked down the door for a thousand other guitarists who studied his technique and tone and then attempted something similar.

The trio of Third Power out of Farmington Hills near Detroit were on Vanguard and perhaps the heaviest and most psychedelic of any on the label.

They didn't last long, just one album – Believe – in 1970.

Located along the power trio axis of Hendrix and the Cream – with a powerful pop quality alongside the freakout – they were real hard rockers wrapped in the bright colours of the period. The guitarist Drew Abbott (who shared singing duties with bassist Jem Targal) was the key player and after the band broke up he joined up with Targal's neighbour in his band.

believeThat neighbour was Bob Seger and Abbott was on all of Seger's Silver Bullet Band albums from the early Seventies (among them Beautiful Loser, Live Bullet, Night Moves and Stranger in Town) before quitting in the early Eighties, when the gloss went off Seger as he became more commercial.

The good news is the Third Power's Believe album (with a couple of extra tracks) is on Spotify and it's a real Play Loud psychedelic rock album, with some typically dreamy songs.

Check out Gettin' Together.

Incidentally two of their tracks appeared on this Vanguard compilation. 

For more oddities, one-offs or songs with an interesting backstory check the massive back-catalogue at From the Vaults.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   From the Vaults articles index

The Wailers: And I Love Her (1965)

The Wailers: And I Love Her (1965)

Although Bob Marley came to prominence in, and dominated, the Seventies, we often forget he was an exact contemporary of the Beatles in the Sixties. When they were in Abbey Road recording Can't... > Read more

Little Willie John: Let Them Talk (1960)

Little Willie John: Let Them Talk (1960)

One of Bob Marley's greatest and most pivotal songs was Soul Rebel, in the earliest version you can hear him moving away from the secular rude boy world into embracing the Rastafarian faith. He... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Johnson/Dreyer/Lockett: Any Last Requests (digital outlets)

Johnson/Dreyer/Lockett: Any Last Requests (digital outlets)

Well, you have to be a very seasoned and confident trio to play in New York City and let the audience request material from the Great American Songbook . . . because that ain't no Fake Book but a... > Read more

The Specials: The Best of the Specials (EMI)

The Specials: The Best of the Specials (EMI)

Listening to this 20-track compilation (which comes with an excellent DVD of videos and film footage) reminds you just how reductive the recent ska revivalist bands have been. In the late... > Read more