Tomasz Stanko: Dark Eyes (ECM/Ode)

 |   |  <1 min read

Tomasz Stanko Quintet: May Sun
Tomasz Stanko: Dark Eyes (ECM/Ode)

Polish trumpeter Stanko has been introduced previously at Elsewhere on the ocassion of his excellent Lontano album.

Here with yet another line-up he essays some slightly sombre territory (The Dark Eyes of Martha Hirsch, Krzysztof Komeda's Dirge For Europe) with a kind of European stateliness which isn't quite as emotionally gripping as some of his previous work. That said, these pieces also have a haunting (and haunted) quality and when married to his early Sixties-Miles Davis tone they can shimmer with great beauty.

The playing is excellent and you long to hear guitarist Jakob Bro out on his own, he sits neatly in that area of John Abercrombie.

But artistic though this may be, it generally fails to ignite in the way Stanko usually does. One for his followers certainly, but it isn't the best place to start on this fine trumpeter, or the groups he helms. 

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Jazz articles index

Bobo Stenson Trio: Cantando (ECM/Ode)

Bobo Stenson Trio: Cantando (ECM/Ode)

Swedish pianist Stenson is one of those rare individuals who extends the contract of improvisation by deliberately drawing on diverse source material, which gives him and his musicians different... > Read more

GREG HEATH IN LONDON 2009: Kiwi jazz in another climate

GREG HEATH IN LONDON 2009: Kiwi jazz in another climate

Saxophonist Greg Heath has been in London for two decades now, so you’d have to have a long memory to recall him alongside Rick Bryant in the early 80s as a member of The Neighbours – a... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

ROTTEN: NO IRISH, NO BLACKS, NO DOGS by JOHN LYDON: Reviewed 1994

ROTTEN: NO IRISH, NO BLACKS, NO DOGS by JOHN LYDON: Reviewed 1994

“With the Sex Pistols we were hated, absolutely despised. There was no audience there at all to any great extent. We sold a few records in a small banana republic called Britain.”... > Read more

Texas Jim Robertson: The Last Page of Mein Kampf (1946)

Texas Jim Robertson: The Last Page of Mein Kampf (1946)

Texas-born Jim Robertson was one of those who sang about the Second World War and knew what he was talking about. No stay-at-home, when he was rejected by the army he enlisted in the marines and... > Read more