Anouar Brahem: Le Voyage de Sahar (ECM/Ode)

 |   |  <1 min read

Anouar Brahem: Sur Le Fleve
Anouar Brahem: Le Voyage de Sahar (ECM/Ode)

Tunisian Brahem who plays oud --- like a slack-string lute -- steers another fine album under his own name on ECM, a label with a reputation for meticulously produced if sometime emotionally distant music.

Here with pianist Francois Couturier and accordionist Jean-Louis Matinier these exotic and evocative pieces conjure up cool nights -- rather than hot days -- in the Sahara and there is an almost psychic sense of understanding between the musicians.

At times this has all the stately elegance of European chamber music (transposed to a souk or caravanserai), at other times it is intense and commanding. But everywhere this spare and sensitive music is simply beguiling.

Enticing to listen to carefully, but equally welcome drifting away in the background.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Jazz articles index

Orchestra of Spheres: Nonagonic Now (Sound Explorers)

Orchestra of Spheres: Nonagonic Now (Sound Explorers)

This rhythm-driven four-piece from Wellington is one part early Talking Heads (or the Feelies as a jazz ensemble), a slug of Sun Ra if he'd come from South East Asia and not Saturn, some seriously... > Read more

THE MODERN JAZZ QUARTET (1968-70): Lost in the big Apple

THE MODERN JAZZ QUARTET (1968-70): Lost in the big Apple

If you had a bottomless pit of money to start your own record company, who would you sign? That's what the Beatles faced when they launched Apple Records in early 68. Their famous ad which... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

ERIC BIBB INTERVIEWED (2009): Born into this

ERIC BIBB INTERVIEWED (2009): Born into this

You could say singer-guitarist Eric Bibb had little choice, that he was born to the musical life: his father Leon was a well-known New York folk singer; his uncle was John Lewis, the pianist in... > Read more

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . HASIL ADKINS: Howling at the night

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . HASIL ADKINS: Howling at the night

Whatever his style was, fame had no interest in embracing it. The closest this rockabilly blues screamer -- who started in the mid Fifties -- came to wider recognition was when the Cramps covered... > Read more