Jerkagram and Martin Escalante: Parkour (577 Records/digital outlets)

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Jerkagram and Martin Escalante: Parkour (577 Records/digital outlets)

First let us tell you – warn you perhaps – who has influenced the Jerkagram noise duo of Californian twins Derek and Brent who “play” guitars, drums, loops and so on: Captain Beefheart, Boredoms and Keiji Haino.

You might, after listening, add the squeal of tyres, fingernails down a blackboard, broken electric equipment . . .

This noisecore-cum-experimental sound album – with self-taught saxophonist Martin Escalante – will be something of an endurance test for most, this writer included who actually likes much free jazz and experimental noise.

But this is mostly shapeless and broadcasts on a narrow, angry frequency (aside from the shorter central pieces) and even at 33 minutes it seems very long.

You can hear this album on Spotify here but actually we note it because it is on the otherwise interesting 577 label out of New York whose previous mentions at Elsewhere we now take the opportunity to remind you of.


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