Edwin Derricut: Symmetry (Pure)

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Edwin Derricut: Symmetry
Edwin Derricut: Symmetry (Pure)

Elsewhere frequently gets albums from local artists wanting to be posted and reviewed, but to be honest very few make it through.

You'll note that last year only the likes of Paul McLaney, Reb Fountain, Dudley Benson, Miriam Clancy and a few others made the final cut.

You have to be good to be in the company of Bob Dylan, Soaud Massi, Tom Waits and so on.

This singer-songwriter flies through on a first hearing: deft lyrics, memorable and gentle songs, thoughtful but passionate, and songs written and recorded on his bus as he travelled around the country. Yes, it does sound a bit hippie.

Actually, Derricut's an architect -- which somewhat explains why his songs are so reflective: they are an emotional and spiritual escape from the working world. These are songs to gently immerse yourself in and repeat play brings out the musical subtlety and lyrical nuance.

It came out on an independent label last year but floated off into the ether. It is now available again. Timeless stuff anyway. 

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