Gecko Turner: Guapapasea! (Rhythmethod)

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Gecko Turner: Nina da Guadiana
Gecko Turner: Guapapasea! (Rhythmethod)

The absurdly named Gecko Turner is actually a Spanish producer and composer who has fronted bands, won awards, and effected a pleasantly lazy meltdown of global pop and dance styles into something which is distinctively Spanish despite its eclecticism.

He opens here with a barely recognisable treatment of Dylan's Subterranean Homesick Blues (kinda cruisy, for cocktail hour!) and later includes version of Marley's Rainbow Country, both of which fit the lightly funking, soulful sounds, Latin percussion and mellow mood. Real nice summertime sound.

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