Basia Bulat: Oh, My Darling (Rough Trade/Shock)

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Basia Bulat: Oh, My Darling (Rough Trade/Shock)

On this, her debut album, Canadian Bulat establishes herself as a slightly eccentric (but not irritatingly whacko) voice whose songs are enhanced by canny production which allows for the folk and pop elements of her songwriting to sit alongside some distinctive arrangements.

With dulcimer, mandolin, guitar and a string section, there are strong folk references here, but Bulat's effortless vibrato, the often off-kilter piano and percussion, and rustic waltzes create an album of downhome charm but which could find a place on a courageous radio station.

Not an immediate grabber, but this definitely rewards repeat plays.

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