CoCo Rosie: The Adventures of Ghost Horse and Stillborn (Rhythmethod)

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Coco Rosie: Black Poppies
CoCo Rosie: The Adventures of Ghost Horse and Stillborn (Rhythmethod)

I'll admit this is my first encounter with the bewitching Cassidy sisters who are Coco Rosie, but I have fallen under their strange spell: soft hip-hop beats and simple samples; fairytale lyrics delivered somewhere between a more reigned in Bjork and more melodic Yoko Ono; childlike charm and yet some dense psychological drama alongside silliness . . .

Quirky and unnerving in places, utterly engrossing throughout. I have no idea what to make of them -- but none of this seems forced or in any way self-consciously oddball.

It just sounds utterly wonderful.

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