Holly Cole: Holly Cole (Alert)

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Holly Cole: The House Is Haunted By The Echo of Your Last Goodbye
Holly Cole: Holly Cole (Alert)

Cole is the dark mistress of jazz-noir which probably sounds best in an ill-lit nightclub as you are waiting for Bogie and Bacall to drop in.

That kind of smoke-filled and evocative music. Alley Cat Song is a typical Cole title. With a terrific band (which includes Gil Goldstein on piano, Marty Ehrlich and Lenny Pickett on saxes, and bassist Greg Cohen) Cole drags the notes lazily, oozes ennui and sounds like she's forgotten more about sex, love and loss than you'll ever know.

Yes, it is all an act -- but on these songs by Jobim, Legrand, Berlin, Porter and some originals -- it's a pretty classy one.

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