Tim Gane and Sean O'Hagan: La Vie d'Artiste (Too Pure)

 |   |  <1 min read

Tim Gane and Sean O'Hagan: Yoko Johnson
Tim Gane and Sean O'Hagan: La Vie d'Artiste (Too Pure)

In the long and ever-changing list of "favourite bands" two names come up for me consistently, Stereolab and the criminally ignored High Llamas whose Sean O'Hagan was doing Brian Wilson better than Wilson was for over a decade.

Soundtracks in the absence of seeing or knowing much about the movie can be difficult affairs, but with Stereolab's Gane and O'Hagan penning the music for Marc Fitoussi's French flick this one is gentle gem: plenty of soft-light strings, some of those classic Beach Boys arrangements (sans vocals), suggestions of Bacharach, drifting ambient sounds, quirky French cafe music . . .

There is a temptation to describe this as dinner party music but that would be unfair. It can certainly serve the purpose of being charming background music, but there is quirky stuff going on which repays careful attention.

This is also a generous double disc: the first being the movie music, the second being material that didn't make the final cut.

Positively charming.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Ghost Wave: Ghost Wave (Arch Hill)

Ghost Wave: Ghost Wave (Arch Hill)

With some of the momentum of their labelmates the Clean, urgent droning vocals and pure psychedelic guitar jangle, this debut EP by the Auckland-based three-piece touches a lot of familiar places... > Read more

Tono and the Finance Company: Fragile Thing EP (Border)

Tono and the Finance Company: Fragile Thing EP (Border)

One of the nicest things about small indie artists is the care they lavish on the presentation of their low-key albums. Witness the delightful Tokey Tones albums or even the more rough-hewn albums... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Amadou and Miriam: Welcome to Mali (Warners)

Amadou and Miriam: Welcome to Mali (Warners)

Just by the sheer number of artists it produces, you'd have to say Mali seems to have -- like Jamaica -- an almost unnatural number of gifted, inventive musicians, many of whom have appeared at... > Read more

Jethro Tull, Al Stewart: Hanging on the telephone.

Jethro Tull, Al Stewart: Hanging on the telephone.

Rock journalists in this country need little reminding that we live a long way from the action. But the reminders come every time a record company or promoter says that deathless phrase,... > Read more