Tunng: Good Arrows (Full Time Hobby)

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Tunng: Bricks
Tunng: Good Arrows (Full Time Hobby)

This Anglofolk-cum-indie altpop outfit were a previous Elsewhere pick with their beguiling and sometimes baffling Comments of the Inner Chorus.

At time they sound like the Incredible String Band without the fey folksiness, at others like the Beta Band (a good thing) or the Penguin Cafe Orchestra, or evoke hot Hawaiian beaches beside a dark English forest, or seduce you with a gorgeous melody while telling you were all going to end up dead . . .

By using found sounds alongside lots of acoustic instruments, working off some clever up-close harmony vocals, and with oddball lyrics (which can sometimes feel a wee bit forced in their quirkiness), Tunng have cordoned off an area which is entirely their own and not surprisingly this, their third and most pop-conscious album, has picked up excellent reviews in the UK.

Easy to listen to, but not an easy listen if you get my drift.

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