Trip to the Moon: Welcome to the Big Room (Ode)

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Trip to the Moon: Long Lost Days
Trip to the Moon: Welcome to the Big Room (Ode)

This astral-ambient and very trippy outfit from Auckland record far too infrequently for my liking, and this seductive offering is further evidence of the singular path they have been travelling on: deliciously textured music which refers to space-flight jazz and the most refined aspects of 70s prog-rock, but is never over-indulgent.

Trip are multi-instrumentalists Trevor Reekie and Tom Ludvigson, and here their crew are guitarist Nigel Gavin and trumpeter Greg Johnson (firm favourites at Elsewhere), senior jazz statesman Jim Langabeer on Japanese flute and sopranino sax) and Johnny Fleury on Chapman stick (sort of a bass guitar thingy, but more so).

There is an electronica element, but as with Brian Eno's work the sheer melodicism and warmth of the music makes this very human and engaging - and very headphone friendly.

Lovely acoustic piano piece in Piano Bar, a night in a hip bar on a spacecraft in the title track, a jazz shuffle on Hamba Humito, and evocative moods everywhere.

Turn off your mind, relax and float downstream . . .

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