Sigur Ros; Hvarf/Heim (EMI) BEST OF ELSEWHERE 2007

 |   |  <1 min read

Sigur Ros: Von
Sigur Ros; Hvarf/Heim (EMI) BEST OF ELSEWHERE 2007

More mysterious loveliness on a double-disc which, in the release schedule of most bands, might have seemed like a stop-gap measure: previously unreleased tracks and rarities, and stripped-back versions of other material.

If Eric Clapton or the Arctic Monkeys had done this you'd be yawning.

But Sigur Ros from Iceland create such eerie sonic landscapes -- some stretching to an 10 engrossing minutes -- that this has the feel of yet another beguiling chapter in a story you hope will never end.

Sigur Ros have, quite literally, created their own language (Hopelandic they call it) and make the music -- which owes very little to rock, even post-rock -- to match it. Enchanting.

And if it didn't appear in too many other lists of "best albums" it is because I believe too many other writers gave a cursory listen or looke dat the cover and took it to be that stop-gap thing.

Good Lord, a hiatus should always be this good.

By the way, the doco-DVD Heima which is the companion to this double disc is a gem.

Best music DVD of the year? Very likely.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Thieves: Thieves (thievesss.bandcamp)

Thieves: Thieves (thievesss.bandcamp)

While I'm sure the three members of Auckland band Thieves wouldn't claim to be reinventing the rock genre (or would hope they wouldn't), on this six-song EP -- their second I believe -- they... > Read more

Jason Collett; Idols of Exile (Rhythmethod) BEST OF ELSEWHERE 2006

Jason Collett; Idols of Exile (Rhythmethod) BEST OF ELSEWHERE 2006

This Canadian singer-songwriter makes a big impression on this very likeable and diverse debut album: at times he sounds like a less irritating David Grey, elsewhere he reveals some beautiful pop... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . HUGUES PANASSIE: Writing a line through jazz

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . HUGUES PANASSIE: Writing a line through jazz

Depending on what angle you look at Hugues Panassie from, the Parisian was either jazz's greatest European advocate and instigator in the Thirties and Forties. Or he was a divisive and... > Read more

STEVE WINWOOD PROFILED (2011): From teen-soul boy to mainstream man

STEVE WINWOOD PROFILED (2011): From teen-soul boy to mainstream man

When the salty bluesman Howlin' Wolf growled “the men don't know, but the little girls understand” on the 1961 Willie Dixon-penned Back Door Man we know he was talking about... > Read more