Robert Scott: Tascam Hits (Powertool Records)

 |   |  <1 min read

Robert Scott: Tascam Hits (Powertool Records)

These low-fi home recordings by Scott -- a member of the Bats and the Clean -- were recorded in the late 90s and those who demand their music polished and honed won't find much of interest here.

But these delightful working drawing of songs, eerie instrumentals and sonic ideas -- all put down on a Tascam cassette recorder -- have much to recommend them.

Bats fans will hear echoes of that band in places, notably the opener Viva, but elsewhere there are aural explorations in tribute to the innovative German producer Conny Plank who worked with Cluster, Eno etc.

In a sense you do some of the work (imagining them rendered larger, wider, stronger) but Scott's melodic sensibilities and the quasi-ambient quality make for an album which is considerably more than the sum of its many small but fascinating parts.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

FleaBITE: In Your Ear (Jayrem)

FleaBITE: In Your Ear (Jayrem)

Everyone is allowed to have fun, right? Which is why Elsewhere sometimes includes bizarre or just plain stupid stuff when it pulls From the Vaults. And also why we posted the Fatcat and Fishface... > Read more

Greg Fleming and the Trains: Edge of the City (LucaDiscs)

Greg Fleming and the Trains: Edge of the City (LucaDiscs)

Some albums come with lyrics sheets which you think must be embarrassing for the "songwriter". Not so Aucklander Greg Fleming whose lyrics are so economic that as you listen you can... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Max Romeo: War Ina Babylon (1976)

Max Romeo: War Ina Babylon (1976)

When Max Romeo's Holding Out My Love to You album was released in '81 it came with heavy patronage: Keith Richards was a Romeo fan and had produced some of the tracks . . . so there was a cover... > Read more

MANFRED EICHER OF ECM RECORDS, INTERVIEWED (1992): Art for the artists' sake

MANFRED EICHER OF ECM RECORDS, INTERVIEWED (1992): Art for the artists' sake

As much as a disembodied voice down a phone line can, Manfred Eicher confirms the impression he made on English journalist Richard Cook when he visited London in late ’89: “He is a... > Read more