The Broken Heartbreakers: The Broken Heartbreakers (Rhythmethod) BEST OF ELSEWHERE 2007

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The Broken Heartbreakers: Come on Home
The Broken Heartbreakers: The Broken Heartbreakers (Rhythmethod) BEST OF ELSEWHERE 2007

With a sound which draws equally on the Left Banke, the Everly Brothers, Brian Wilson, Beatles, alt.country harmonies and the Anglofolk tradition, this Auckland group can hardly fail.

In songwriter John Guy Howell they also have someone with a genuine gift, and the arrangements here -- minimal guitars, a lovely drone quality in Angels, mellotron and mandolin -- are utterly seductive.

Mike Irwin, a writer from Dunedin described them thus, and it is perfect: "It's country music for the bus downtown, spiritual music for top-shelf believers, psychedelic music for those on a come down".

It is also intelligent, heartfelt, aching and entrancing.

Wonderful album.

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