Tim Guy: Hummabyes (Monkey)

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Tim Guy: Cater For Lovers
Tim Guy: Hummabyes (Monkey)

This gentle album is so light it makes the Bats sound like Thin Lizzy.

Auckland-based singer-songwriter Guy has stripped his music back to airy arrangments for guitar and bass (with ukulele, slide, harmonica and triangle where required) but the whole thing has a summershine spaciousness and the smart production lets these whimsical (but never twee) songs breathe even more gently.

Beautiful backing vocals by Anika Moa and Anna Coddington, a few classy but discreet guests, and who knew the Tokey Tones would ever have such a profound influence? Soft pop which just charms like crazy -- right up until the final track which is a funny and wheezy singalong for drunken uncles at a wedding.

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