Jack Penate: Matinee (XL)

 |   |  <1 min read

Jack Penate: Learning Lines
Jack Penate: Matinee (XL)

This gritty, rocking album has been floating around for a few weeks but seems to have been passed over by most writers.

That's strange given Penate's high profile in the UK where he has been hailed like a Billy Bragg on heat, as a South London soul poet, and "the new darling of pop" (The Sun)

There is an undeniable energy to his smartly crafted songs which equally recall the Jam, the Tom Robinson Band and anxious folk-punks. But he also has a wonderful way with a melodic ballad (the gorgeous string-supported We Will Be Here) which suggests that he is a whole lot smarter than his noisy peers and is in for the long haul.

He has a musical reach and ambition that is barely hinted at on this impressive debut. Get in now and avoid the rush.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Dave Murphy: Yes That's Me (Ode)

Dave Murphy: Yes That's Me (Ode)

Yes, and that's me with the quote on the back cover of this excellent collection by longstanding Wellington bluesman Dave Murphy.Here's what I say: "The blues is a music made by people who... > Read more

The Avett Brothers: I and Love and You (American)

The Avett Brothers: I and Love and You (American)

This trio (and guests) is fronted by North Carolina brothers Scott and Seth Avett who recorded five albums before this major label debut on Rick Rubin’s American label. Rubin -- producer... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Far North Queensland, Australia: Rock of ages

Far North Queensland, Australia: Rock of ages

By the time we get to the top, and it is only a slight uphill walk for 15 minutes, we are breathless in the dry heat and reaching for our water bottles. Below us the smooth sealed Peninsula... > Read more

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . HASIL ADKINS: Howling at the night

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . HASIL ADKINS: Howling at the night

Whatever his style was, fame had no interest in embracing it. The closest this rockabilly blues screamer -- who started in the mid Fifties -- came to wider recognition was when the Cramps covered... > Read more