Marie "Queenie" Lyons: Soul Fever (Vampi/Southbound)

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Marie Queenie Lyons: Daddy's House
Marie

Queenie Lyons was one of the many soul singers from the late 60s/early 70s whose career was as short as it was impressive: one album, this one, and gone. The little that is known about her is this: she came out of Louisiana on the chitlin' circuit, sang with King Curtis' band, and opened for the likes of Jackie Wilson, Fats Domino and James Brown (who may have scored her these 1970 sessions). And after that she disappeared like smoke.

But in these 12 tracks -- which include her terrific takes on standard soul material like Your Thing Ain't No Good Without My Thing, Your Key Don't Fit No More, Fever, I'll Drown in My Own Tears and Try Me -- are evidence of a singer who could channel hurt, sensuality and passion with rare commitment.

Someone is bound to track down Queenie if she's still out there, meantime this reissue stands as her finest hour.

Or, more correctly, 34 minutes.

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