Pop Levi: Never Never Love (Border)

 |   |  1 min read

Pop Levi: Wannamama
Pop Levi: Never Never Love (Border)

Recently Mika and Kylie proved the durability of mindless, glam-pop which comes splattered with glitter and huge choruses, not much in the way of emotional depth and is just a whole heap of mindless fun.
Those who criticised the enormously enjoyable Mika (see below) for ripping off Queen rather missed the point -- which was to rip off Queen.
Pop Levi is in the same territory: he keeps the songs and beats relatively simple, shoves the choruses at you frequently just so you don't forget (sometimes there seems nothing but choruses), and makes music for the disco/partyland club.
This one -- which should be played loud and often -- was recorded in Quincy Jones' old Hollywood studio (where Thriller and Off the Wall were done) and Levi lifts as adeptly from r'n'b, Jackson and electro soul-funk as he does from T Rex, big chord Britpop, Robbie Williams, Boney M and anything else that takes his fancy.
Not much is happening here other than fun (although he slips in the odd ballad and breakup song to leaven things) and you gotta love an album where tracks are titled Wannamama, Fire on Your Feet, You Don't Gotta Run, Love You Straight . . .
My guess is this one will be skewered by the po-faced who "didn't get" The Darkness, loved by those who couldn't care less about cool and ignored by almost everyone.
It's a crowded world out there and Pop Levi will struggle to find space, but he deserves attention for his sheer arrested-adolescence nerve, flamboyance and those silly choruses.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Various: Playing for Change (Hear Music/Universal)

Various: Playing for Change (Hear Music/Universal)

You leave yourself open to contempt and not supporting the good cause if you slag off a Save the Whales/Orphans/Poor concert if you observe "but the music was awful". So it is with this... > Read more

Beirut: March of the Zapotec/Realpeople Holland (Rhythmethod)

Beirut: March of the Zapotec/Realpeople Holland (Rhythmethod)

After the excellent Francophile-framed The Flying Cup by Beirut (aka peripatetic American Zach Condon), the Mexican music on the first of these two discs (a mere 15 minutes long) comes as a major... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Various, Urban Asian (Nascente/Triton)

Various, Urban Asian (Nascente/Triton)

Two of my sons live in Brixton and one of exciting things about walking the streets -- aside from being offered drugs every 10 paces -- is the soundtrack booming out of shops and cars: old reggae... > Read more

Ronnie Earl and the Broadcasters: Spread the Love (Stony Plain)

Ronnie Earl and the Broadcasters: Spread the Love (Stony Plain)

Blues guitarist Earl opens this typically free-wheeling, jazz-inflected instrumental album with a swinging treatment of Albert Collins' burning Backstroke -- then gets into a low mood on Blues For... > Read more