Beth Rowley: Little Dreamer (Universal)

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Beth Rowley: Almost Persuaded
Beth Rowley: Little Dreamer (Universal)

In the wake of the success of Duffy comes this bluesy singer from Bristol who also possesses a touch of French chanteuse and pop belter in her delivery, is courageous enough to open her debut album with a downbeat version of the old standard Nobody's Fault But Mine (which Led Zepp covered), deliver Dylan's I Shall be Released with a reggae shuffle (not good) and cover Willie Nelson's Angel Flying Too Close to the Ground (with guest Duke Special, an Elsewhere favourite).
She isn't easily pigeonholed -- she gets a country gospel feel on When The Rains Came -- but writes memorable blues-based but poppy material (would love to have heard Sandie Shaw do Oh My Life back in the day), and closes with the traditional Beautiful Tomorrow.
Excellent backing band, and kudos from the UK such as "the Next Big Thing" (the Independent).
Not the new Duffy though because she's not quite as easy, or as consistent, a proposition -- but she's in it for the long haul.

There is an interview with Beth Rowley at Absolute Elsewhere.

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Glenn Bittle - Nov 25, 2008

I prefer Beth's voice to Duffy's - a little more interesting, at least to my ears!

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