Neil Worboys and the Real Time Liners: Some Day Soon (Ode)

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Neil Worboys and the Real Time Liners: Some Day Soon (Ode)

The blues gets short shrift in the New Zealand critical community (see comments about Billy TK Jnr) and my guess is that most writers think it is somehow easy to play. Or is sort of "imported" (and reggae, indie.rock and alt.country ain't??)
Anyway these guys from Wellington play that terminally unhip music -- and play it well.
Singer Worboys has a career which goes back to the Bulldogs Allstar Goodtime Band and a later version of Hogsnort Rupert, but here with a bar-tested band makes his way through gruff-voiced originals (and instrumentals) coloured by hard harmonica, pedal steel, Hammond organ and -- where required -- kazoo and jug.
Certainly this will sound better in a bar, but from his raw edge guitar to the romantic swoon of slide guitar, the hum of the Hammond and deep thunk of upright bass this once stands up well in the homefront -- with a bit of volume.

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Maunderer - May 23, 2010

Quite agree: i picked this album up on Friday, and it's had repeat playings this weekend. The Blues ain't easy, but these guys hit it well, and hit it hard.

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