The Checks: Alice By The Moon (Pie Club)

 |   |  1 min read

The Checks: God Birds
The Checks: Alice By The Moon (Pie Club)

If this was "the difficult second album" for local rock'n'roll darlings The Checks it certainly doesn't sound it: it struts with well placed self-assurance and if in places the song-craft isn't quite what we might expect you have to hand it to them, they have broadened their palette from that British r'n'b rock '65 sound which was their hallmark.

Here they cannon off into thick riffery which has echoes of early Led Zeppelin, unleash some guitar firepower in the manner of mid-period Hendrix and indulge in some eerie psychedelics.

There's a case to be made that the album doesn't start with its strongest material, but certainly by Ballroom Baby (four tracks into a 13 song journey) with its ticking guitar figures and suggestions of choppy ska riffs, they are right on target. And even better follows. 

Back of the Restaurant -- where vocalist Ed Knowles has a slightly lascivious and lazy delivery -- hints at early Radiohead and Blur, but the sense of menace and laconic lust sets it apart.

Any Man Here Will Run You In works off a weird Anglo-folk feel (driven by industrial strength guitars however) and the sublime, mysterious God Birds as the centrepiece of the album takes off at a midpoint between late Sixties melodic psychedelic rock and the density of Sonic Youth. Think Fleetwood Mac's Albatross conceived by Syd Barrett in Thurston Moore's cement mixer before it unwinds into ambient space music. It is one to hear alright.

On the other hand they aren't averse to some head-nod boogie riffery (Isabella) or bristling power rock (Crows) either.

Singer Knowles (whose voice is processed in places to add an extra texture to it) has widened his range, but a standout feature is the breadth of the guitar sounds this band is now capable of -- which was hinted at on their debut Hunting Whales. Here there is a real snap and twang in places, at other times a buzzsaw attack over woozy keyboards (Let Your Lover Know), and on the thumping You And Me a barbed wire part that wends its way through the middle. There are places where the six strings here really sing'n'sting and restore your faith in the "short, sharp, guitar solo".

And you gotta love any album that ends with a track like the easy pop of Hold My Head which rather charmingly stumbles to a close.

This isn't an album that offers itself up on a first hearing -- and the "random play" button might also work in its favour -- but the Checks have stepped well past their obvious origins into some daring territory. There is ample evidence these guys can hold a band together so it is also likely that this album, outstanding in places as it is, will be an important stepping stone to their killer to come. 

 

Share It

Your Comments

Fraser Gardyne - Jun 8, 2009

The Checks rolled up to the Devonport Wharf last Thursday morning for an acoustic set filmed by C4. I have to say they were outstanding and it made it bloody difficult to leave and catch the ferry to work. Everyone, young and not so young, were hanging on till the last minute before dashing down to board. Ed Knowles relaxed vocal delivery is incredibly powerful and the guys wide range of musical influences and playing ability make them absolutely shit hot. All success to the lads...

tim - Jun 15, 2009

these guys are the only NZ group that have made me stop and walk into the lounge to see who is on the TV, that does not happen very often,you cant put words to why you get up to go and look. You hear it and have to "find out" thats what happened to you when you and the rest of the crowd had to tear yourself away. These guys are truly special

Percival - Jul 6, 2009

ed knowles crooning through parts of verse is a reasuring delight to the sound that was proven in memory walking in Hunting Whales, what the band has been able to achive in Alice by the moon with many more songs that gently ease you into a melody and have can you burst into frenzy. The Checks are a real treat to see live and the variety in song they now posses has them poised for an increased following at home and abroad, if true musical tallent is respected and admired.

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Kasey Chambers: Little Bird (Liberation)

Kasey Chambers: Little Bird (Liberation)

Almost a decade ago this Australian singer-songwriter penned Not Pretty Enough, a penetrating chart-topper about self-doubt. The title track here sounds like its rejoinder with the wisdom of... > Read more

Ellis Island Sound: The Good Seed (Peacefrog)

Ellis Island Sound: The Good Seed (Peacefrog)

At last! I received a preview copy of this wonderful instrumental album almost six months ago and have been waiting ever since to post it. And in that time I kept changing my mind about which... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Neil Young: Out to lunch

Neil Young: Out to lunch

Nothing showy here, but I've spoken to Neil Young three times. And the man was boring and awkward every time. But that's just my opinion. I've never understood why musicians -- especially those... > Read more

RUNNIN' DOWN A DREAM, a doco by PETER BOGDANOVICH (DVD, 2008)

RUNNIN' DOWN A DREAM, a doco by PETER BOGDANOVICH (DVD, 2008)

The American actor/director Peter Bogdanovich (The Last Picture Show, Paper Moon etc and Dr Melfi's psychotherapist in The Sopranos) seems an unusual figure to be behind this four-hour doco of the... > Read more