Sarah Blasko: As Day Follows Night (Universal)

 |   |  1 min read

Sarah Blasko: Lost and Defeated
Sarah Blasko: As Day Follows Night (Universal)

In what looked like a joke, a recent issue of the Australian Rolling Stone described Sarah Blasko as "music's most reluctant star" in the blurb above a story which ran for pages, included a lot of intimate and arty photos, and had the singer-songwriter extensively quoted.

As "reluctant" goes it was hardly in the league of Greta Garbo, Howard Hughes or Scott Walker.

Still, we mustn't judge artists by their publicity and Blasko's sensitive, literate and cleverly arranged songs (closer to Rufus Wainwright in cabaret mode than Joni Mitchell) do suggest a pensive and slightly melancholy soul who might prefer to shun the light of public scrutiny -- this despite a seemingly confessional quality that runs through many songs.

There is a winningly simple melodicism at work here and although her voice is often light and full of slightly twee innocence, when she pushes herself her vocals can be forceful and as the strings rise behind her she seems to gain even great power and emotional momentum.

Recorded in Stockholm and calling on musicians who seem to understand this gently dramatic cabaret/Marianne Faithfull/film-noir/sweet soundtrack style intimately, this is one of those immediately appealing but deep albums which will have some longevity.

For all those soundbed components (nicely prominent and melodic but not overbearing drumming), Blasko keeps her ears firmly planted in pop structures with songs which are as chock full of hooks as any Kate Bush, Bacharach or Camera Obscura pop song and memorably simple lyrics: "hold on my heart" "is my baby yours?" "we won't run, we can fight" will come to you after a first reference.

Love -- and especially its loss -- is her theme but here is optimism (as the title suggets) and in a world getting mighty crowded with not dissimilar voices and slightly uneasy girl-women singers wearing cardies, Blasko really does stand out on the strength of this album.


Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Linda Ronstadt: Hand Sown . .. Home Grown/Silk Purse (Raven/EMI)

Linda Ronstadt: Hand Sown . .. Home Grown/Silk Purse (Raven/EMI)

Long before she was a country-rock cover star and dating California governor Jerry Brown in the late Seventies, Linda Ronstadt was a singer struggling to find her forte. Her albums with the... > Read more

Patty Griffin: Children Running Through (Shock)

Patty Griffin: Children Running Through (Shock)

Exceptional. Griffin defies convenient categories: she can convincingly deliver an ethereal ballad, persuasive soul-funk like a Boho Beat, intense country with Emmylou Harris, abrasive and... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Casiotone for the Painfully Alone: Etiquette (2006)

Casiotone for the Painfully Alone: Etiquette (2006)

If nothing else, you had to raise a smile at the nom-de-disque which American singer-songwriter Owen Ashworth adopted. It announces its lo-fi quality, and identifies its audience at the same time.... > Read more

LIFESTYLES OF THE RICH AND FABULOUS: Money for nothing and the chicks for free

LIFESTYLES OF THE RICH AND FABULOUS: Money for nothing and the chicks for free

"Let me tell you about the very rich. They are different from you and me. They possess and enjoy early, and it does something to them, makes them soft where we are hard, and cynical where we... > Read more