J Tillman: Year in the Kingdom (Shock)

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J Tillman: Age of Man
J Tillman: Year in the Kingdom (Shock)

Possessing the same kind of intimate, engrossing voice of Nick Drake and with an equal interest in hushed, dreamlike ballads where death, and the transitory nature of life and love are themes, Josh Tillman offers his sixth album where the songs are barely fleshed out but the sinew and strength are immediately apparent.

With discreet dulcimer, piano and string arrangements around the acoustic guitar, these nine songs have an uncanny stillness and ease at their centre and Tillman's vocals (like Eddie Vedder just waking from a deep reverie) sometimes have a transcendent quality where lyrics suggest emotional states or moments in time.

My understanding is that Tillman is or was a sometime member of Fleet Foxes (he is certainly thanked on their album) and you can hear a hint of their choral folk on Though I Have Wronged You.

Whatever his connections, this will be the quietest, most transporting album you will hear in a very long time. 

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