America: Back Pages (Shock)

 |   |  <1 min read

America: Caroline No
America: Back Pages (Shock)

There's a slight irony here perhaps -- America covering other people's songs?

But weren't they the band many thought had covered a Neil Young song with their huge hit Horse with No Name? Certainly sounded like a Young song at first hearing.

This time out though Dewey Bunnell and Gerry Beckley pick up material by Paul Simon (his America oddly enough, which is the oopening track), Joni Mtchell (Woodstock, which makes close-harmony sense), Brian Wilson (Caroline No, again a decent choice for their soft rock approach), the Zombies (Time of the Season) Bob Dylan (My Back Pages, again makes sense given the album title although very earnest) and . . .

And Neil Young's On the Way Home.

Professionally executed with guest guitarist Mark Knopfler (on his Sailing to Philadelphia) and Van Dyke Parks (accordion on My Back Pages), but ultimately an anodyne collection of songs which still resonate more strongly in their original versions.

Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Various Artists: Ten Guitars, the New Zealand Heartland Soundtrack (Universal)

Various Artists: Ten Guitars, the New Zealand Heartland Soundtrack (Universal)

Walking in to a CD/DVD store recently I heard the most unexpected song playing, it was Amigo by Black Slate, a British reggae band which had a brief fliration with the charts at the dawn of the... > Read more

Sugarbug: Flutterbye (Powertool Records)

Sugarbug: Flutterbye (Powertool Records)

As I understand it, this quietly fascinating collection by a Wellington four-piece is a reissue of songs previously unissued. To backtrack then: Some of these 10 songs topped the capital's... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Billy TK Jnr and the Groove Shakers: Blues Benediction (Southbound)

Billy TK Jnr and the Groove Shakers: Blues Benediction (Southbound)

You might think being the guitarist son of Billy TK -- whose name is usually preceded by the phrase "the legendary Maori guitarist" -- might be a serious hindrance to a career under your... > Read more

BEN WEBSTER AND ART TATUM: Genius loves company

BEN WEBSTER AND ART TATUM: Genius loves company

 In my experience, jazz people tend to live in the past. Radio programmes are more often about the greats of yesteryear than the living, jazz mags essay Ellington over ECM, and in any given... > Read more