Rod Stewart: Time (Warners)

 |   |  1 min read

Rod Stewart: It's Over
Rod Stewart: Time (Warners)

At the end of his enjoyable, candid autobiography last year Stewart said he'd started serious songwriting again (after decades). Given he was once a successful and often inspired writer, that was good news.

The reflection necessary for that book seem to have prompted the co-writes here where he declares love for his wife Penny (She Makes Me Happy, Beautiful Morning), respect for the support his late father gave him and his youthful determination to make it (Can't Stop Me Now), a Baby Boomer rumination on a first love (Brighton Beach), separation from a wife (It's Over, presumably about Rachel HUnter), some lost years before love returned (Finest Woman) a message to one of his sons (Live the Life) and so on.

Despite some smart lyrics (which reference his beloved old soul songs and some other classics, check the title track) some of the upbeat songs are little more than stadium-sized choruses and his many naysayers will find his sentimentality a bit hard to tolerate (but wasn't he always a sentimentalist, even as far back as Maggie May?).

Some of these will be crowd pleasers because of their familiarity (he's a little bit Seventies, and a lot of the Eighties in the production) and others will be useful autobiographical filler between the hits at a Las Vegas residency. 

Again he covers a Tom Waits' song (Picture in a Frame) and although Waits loyalists will carp he does it well in his own way.

And this album is just that, Stewart doing it his typically shameless way.

Romantic, sentimental, soulful, calculated or however you read him you gotta love a guy who, at 68, said in his book he'd be gutted if this is “anything less than an international sensation”.

A decent enough swag of the emotional, button-pushing songs here deserve that.


Share It

Your Comments

post a comment

More from this section   Music articles index

Clap Clap Riot: Dull Life (CCR)

Clap Clap Riot: Dull Life (CCR)

Elsewhere’s penchant for classic pop-rock with allusions to punk bristle and power pop elevation gets another shot of pleasure from CCR (our one, who previously appeared in one of our best... > Read more

Princess Chelsea: The Great Cybernetic Depression (Lil' Chief)

Princess Chelsea: The Great Cybernetic Depression (Lil' Chief)

The 2011 debut album Little Golden Book by Chelsea Nikell (aka Princess Chelsea) was an Elsewhere favourite for its subtle blend of coquettish and slightly childlike charm with an adult... > Read more

Elsewhere at Elsewhere

Creedence Clearwater Revival: Green River

Creedence Clearwater Revival: Green River

In a freewheeling and enjoyable interview before a solo show in 2005, John Fogerty -- mainman behind CCRevival -- laughed about how at the height of the counterculture in the late Sixties bands... > Read more

PATRICIA PICCININI CONSIDERED (2014): Empathy and the art of the heart

PATRICIA PICCININI CONSIDERED (2014): Empathy and the art of the heart

The most common defense of intellectually bankrupt or emotionally empty contemporary art is that it “invites the viewer to ask questions”. This is reflexive curator-speak... > Read more